Weekly Writing Challenge: Living History

CIMG0114

sand
replaced
with wood

eyes
searching
distance

walls
breaking

eyes
being
closed

enclosed
in
water
in
wood
touched
by
hands
dirty
of
sin

***

In the Weekly Writing Challenge, the ‘I’ in ‘History’ was asked to be revealed – which event did you effect the most lately? This poem is about the Africans who died in the Mediterranean Sea near Lampedusa (Italy) at the beginning of October 2013 when trying to reach Europe – in search of a better life.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in History rewritten and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

21 Responses to Weekly Writing Challenge: Living History

  1. thanks to the WordPress-Team for choosing this piece as Freshly Pressed: “A capsized boat within sight of Italy, hundreds of would-be immigrants drowned, a continent in denial: a poem”

    Also check out the other great pieces written by other WordPress-users:

    https://twitter.com/freshly_pressed

  2. awax1217 says:

    There should be a better way for people to go from one place to another. If they were not wanted in the other country there would be more enforcement of border crossings. In the United States there is the same problem. We do not want the Mexicans to cross the border yet there are jobs here that they do that we want them here for.

  3. @awax1217: Thanks for your comment. It’s exactly this hypocrisy I dislike in cases like this. We know why people want to leave their countries and don’t help them – then when catastrophes like this happen, suddenly everybody wants the situation to change

  4. glynfedwards says:

    I like how you follow ‘closed’ with ‘enclosed’ on the subsequent line. A fine finish also.

  5. GoosBall says:

    A recent report of UN says that immigranst contribute to the system and are not a burden because they don’t take social benefits.
    But at the same time when immigrants indulge in anti-social activities, their actions are seen as far more serious than the natural citizens

    • Thanks a lot for your comment, GoosBall. I totally agreee with what you said – you just have to imagine what both German states would have done without those immigrants coming from Turkey, Eastern Europe or Central Asia in the 1970ies. Without even speaking of Europe as a whole or the U.S. in the last centuries

  6. Elena Falletti says:

    Reblogged this on Elena Falletti.

  7. Emma Audsley says:

    Reblogged this on The Horrifically Horrifying Horror Blog and commented:
    Good prompt here…

  8. jws says:

    How many people swim the Rio Grande from the USA to Mexico each day? None? Few? Why not? Could it be due to a very corrupt government and culture based on family bonds instead of merit?

    • jws, thanks for your comment. You hint at a very interesting issue – important details of this topic, let it in the US or in Europe, are simply not mirrored in public enough (why do people leave their countries, how many are they, etc.)

  9. menomama3 says:

    Were you mimicking the shape of the “i” in history? A beautiful, simple piece that draws out the horror of the situation.

  10. actually, I didn’t pay attention to that when I wrote the piece : -) thanks a lot, menomama3, for pointing out to me and your feedback on my poem

  11. Dhyan says:

    O o, crowded here ;)

    nice

  12. thanks for your comment! That’s exactly the question – why did they came? What made them so desperate to trust people they shouldn’t trust?

  13. your words are very true. The ignorance of Europeans, not only Italians, to that topic is incredible

  14. yes, it seems to me that a lot of people know we’re leading into wrong ideas, etc., yet nothing changes…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s